Help us to stop bowel cancer

We announce our ambitious move into research

Bowel Cancer UK announce an ambitious new agenda to become the UK's leading research and campaigning charity dedicated to stopping bowel cancer for good.

A new move into research announced by the charity will focus on improving access to early diagnosis, and best treatment and care by unlocking the reasons people die, piece by piece.

In an open letter published hereDeborah Alsina, Chief Executive of Bowel Cancer UK said, "We've had enough of the misery caused by this appalling disease.  So we are re-doubling our efforts and determination to lead the change needed to STOP people dying of bowel cancer."

"Our pledge today is bold: We WILL transform survival rates, from only 1 in every 2 people surviving over 5 years, to 3 out of 4 people surviving bowel cancer by 2025. That's only 10 years away so it's ambitious but we are very determined and will dedicate ourselves to making this a reality."

The charity is calling on the British public to help them put a STOP to bowel cancer and take action. From raising funds, to campaigning for change, Bowel Cancer UK is calling for help to create an unstoppable force to turn a spotlight on cancer's second biggest cancer killer and end its cruelty.

Bowel cancer is the UK's second biggest cancer killer yet it's a disease which is often overlooked and diagnosed too late. Every year over 41,500 people are diagnosed with bowel cancer which equates to a diagnosis every 15 minutes and around 16,000 people die of the disease, more than either breast or prostate cancer.

Professor Richard Wilson, Professor in Cancer Medicine, Queen's University Belfast and Member of Bowel Cancer UK's Medical Advisory Board, supported the announcement, saying: "While remarkable progress has been made in recent years in bowel cancer research, we need to do much more to improve prevention and early diagnosis and provide the best treatment and care for those with all stages of bowel cancer.  Too many people are still suffering and dying, and it's critical that quality of life and survival rates are improved.  I applaud Bowel Cancer UK's move into pioneering research which will benefit current and future patients and help to save lives."

Thirty two year old Katie Scarbrough died in May 2013, leaving a loving family including her husband, Stuart, and their two young children.

"Bowel cancer has taken everything away from me and I hate it.  I hate that it's making me bitter and emotional, I hate that it's given me no hope, I hate that it's made me weak and dependant on people and, most of all, I hate that it's going to take me away from my kids and family."

Katie's passing was a terrible tragedy but sadly her story is all too familiar. Since her death around 32,000 more people have died, among them teenager Stephen Sutton and Lynda Bellingham.